Digital solution TiPPED lets you tip car guards without cash or small change

TiPPED My-iMali
Image credit: tipped.biz

Motorists can now tip car guards without cash or small change via a new digital solution called TiPPED, which has been developed by mobile wallet solutions provider My-iMali.

According to TiPPED’s website, the solution aims to provide a cashless and contact-free tipping environment to South Africans. Although it has started with car guards, it aims to eventually reach others such as petrol attendants and restaurant waiters.

Car guards often do not earn a salary from centre management and rely only on tips from motorists. Some even have to pay bay fees on a sharing basis with their employers.

TiPPED now hopes to enable car guards to earn more money for their services, open up further convenience solutions to them and maintain a contactless tipping environment in the era of COVID-19.

How TiPPED works

Car guards are invited to sign up to TiPPED, after which they will receive a My-iMali mobile wallet and a unique QR code. Motorists and other members of the public also need to have a payment app installed on their phones.

They can use the following banking apps which already have a built-in QR reader: Capitec, FNB Pay, Absa, Nedbank Pay, RMB Pay, Vodapay, Standard Bank, Spot, Zapper and QR Junction (my-iMali).

They can then tip a car guard by scanning his/her unique QR code using a payment app. There is no charge for the tipper on this transaction and the car guard will immediately receive the tip on his/her bank account.

“All you need to do is point your built-in QR reader at the car guard’s QR code on his/her lanyard, select the amount you want to tip and press pay. Easy as that,” TiPPED explained.

Other transactions

The car guards can perform other transactions on their mobile wallets, including buying airtime and data, paying for electricity, transferring their funds to another bank account, or spending their tips at any Wi-Group Merchant (Pick n’ Pay, Dischem, KFC and others).

TiPPED will charge the guards 3 percent of the transaction to fund the service. For instance, if he/she is tipped R10, they will receive R9.70.

“Please remember that tipping, in any form, is not mandatory,” TiPPED said.

“It fills a part of a social responsibility, backing the need to encourage employment. It is done from the goodness of our hearts for services that we feel are deserving.”

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